Toxins and Obesity

I have recently attended a most interesting workshop by Jeff Bland PhD, who pointed out something I know to be true from my practice experience: toxins in our foods and environment are contributing to the obesity epidemic in a major way. What was striking was the finding that diabetes itself  is more highly correlated with organic pollutants such as lindane, bisphenyl A and PCB’s than even obesity itself.

The effect of these pollutants is just starting to be recognized. One target is the mitochondria, the organelle inside the cell that produces energy. The effects of persistent organic pollutants (POP) is great enough that there is a new term for their effect on weight gain-obesogens.

You can reduce the effect of these pollutants through choosing organic foods, avoiding soft plastic containers and following the suggestions for detoxification in The Adaptation Diet to reduce the overall stress on the body.

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Lose Weight Through Adaptation

Susan was typical of many of my patients. She ate pretty well, watching her intake of calories and fats, but she could not budge the weight around her middle. She had been on a variety of diets, they  worked to some degree, but the weight always came back. Even though she counted her calories, something was holding her back.

That something was poor adaptation to the foods in her diet. Unknown to her, she had multiple food allergies to which her body responded with increased cortisol, the main stress hormone. The cortisol increased the visceral abdominal fat which made further weight loss impossible. Poor adaptation also occurred from her lack of fiber rich foods, flavonoid rich foods (darkly colored vegetables and fruits such as cherries, berries, broccoli, kale, chard) and skipping meals to keep her caloric intake down. All of these patterns increased cortisol and stopped the weight loss.

Susan read my new book, The Adaptation Diet, followed the program to a tee, identified her food allergies, added in the right foods and turned around not only her weight, but her energy level and sense of well-being. It is possible to stop  weight gain in its tracks with a few simple dietary changes as outlined in The Adaptation Diet.

Lose Stress, Lose Weight

Sarah, a long-standing patient of mine was baffled. Despite eating well and exercising she had put on thirty pounds in the past two years, mostly around her midsection. In addition she was tired and achy, had poor sleep and worsening memory and concentration. And she was only thirty years old. The one thing that had changed in her life was a difficult divorce leading to on going stress with her ex husband and their two children.

Sarah is not alone in joining the ranks of the obese. Obesity is an epidemic that is sweeping the developed world. Excess weight is not only a risk for diabetes and heart disease, but recent research has shown obesity associated with increased cancer incidence and worse outcomes in those with cancer. Dietary habits are strongly linked to this new health challenge, especially the use of high glycemic foods (those that spike blood sugar), excess calories (supersized meals) and fats that stimulate inflammation (trans fats, baked goods, red meat and whole dairy not organically produced).  One common thread in all these dietary indiscretions is the effect on blood chemistry including elevating cortisol levels, the main stress hormone from the adrenal gland. (see The Adaptation Diet for more info.)However, as Sarah now knows, it is not diet alone that raises cortisol and increases the risk for obesity and disease. The other major trigger is chronic stress.

Cortisol is essential for life, without it survival would be impossible.  It is the main way we respond to any stress mobilizing energy through release of fatty acids, raising blood sugar, moving blood from the digestive system to the muscles. In addition cortisol suppresses the immune system, reduces inflammation and decreases sex hormone production. It is catabolic, breaking down muscle for energy. All these changes help survival, and normally after the stress is resolved, cortisol returns to baseline levels.

However, the stress we experience today and that experienced by our ancestors  and to which our body’s response is geared are different. In past generations stressful events were about survival: you either caught lunch or you were lunch. Today, whether the stress is a boss who does not respect you, a sick family member, a difficult relationship, or dealing with the onslaught of stimulation and lack of quiet time, the cortisol response does not resolve as it does after a fight or flight response.  Elevated cortisol continues to change the body and is associated with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, depression, and increased cancer risks. This is what happened to Sarah.

To gain control over the stress response, Sarah used the information from Power of the Five Elements to understand her Adaptation Type. She learned that the anger and frustration she was carrying was so difficult to let go of because  she was a Wood Adaptation Type who has a very hard time with forgiveness and patience. Once she was able to see her behavior through this ‘map’. she followed exercises to enhance her ability to forgive and reduced her cortisol and eventually lost the extra pounds as well as learning to feel better about herself.

The Adaptation Diet

I have a new book to be released in early February, The Adaptation Diet, which details how to control excess stress hormones including cortisol, leading to weight loss. reduced risk of heart disease and diabetes and improved adaptation to stress.

The diet is based on 30 years of clinical experience and hundreds of research articles. The key aspects to control cortisol are to reduce inflammation, stabilize blood sugar, avoid food allergies and use large amounts of adaptogenic foods.

On this blog I will post summaries of  research on nutrition that is in agreement with the ideas of The Adaptation Diet.