Lose Weight Through Adaptation

Susan was typical of many of my patients. She ate pretty well, watching her intake of calories and fats, but she could not budge the weight around her middle. She had been on a variety of diets, they  worked to some degree, but the weight always came back. Even though she counted her calories, something was holding her back.

That something was poor adaptation to the foods in her diet. Unknown to her, she had multiple food allergies to which her body responded with increased cortisol, the main stress hormone. The cortisol increased the visceral abdominal fat which made further weight loss impossible. Poor adaptation also occurred from her lack of fiber rich foods, flavonoid rich foods (darkly colored vegetables and fruits such as cherries, berries, broccoli, kale, chard) and skipping meals to keep her caloric intake down. All of these patterns increased cortisol and stopped the weight loss.

Susan read my new book, The Adaptation Diet, followed the program to a tee, identified her food allergies, added in the right foods and turned around not only her weight, but her energy level and sense of well-being. It is possible to stop  weight gain in its tracks with a few simple dietary changes as outlined in The Adaptation Diet.

Foods to Improve Adaptation and Cholesterol

When I do talks to the public one of the messages I give is to invest in your health and don’t let your cells go extinct. To protect your cells and organ function there are food groups which are not used enough in most people’s diet  that are extremely beneficial in improving cholesterol levels, blood sugar levels and reducing inflammatory hormones. First among these are legumes which include soybean, split peas, lentils, navy and other beans. These foods are rich in soluble fiber, protein and complex carbohydrates leading to improved markers of biochemical adaptation. Use one-half cup a day and your cells will be happy.

In addition, consumption of one-quarter cup per day of almonds, hazelnuts, pecan, walnuts and other tree nuts was found to improve levels of fiber, Vitamin E, calcium, magnesium, and potassium and lower intake of sodium.  Nuts should be consumed raw and organically grown. They can reduce total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol and are a great source of protein. The high potassium and low sodium found in nuts can help with hypertension as well.

Simple dietary changes can go a long way towards prevention of stress induced disease and improve adaptation as described in The Adaptation Diet.